SAACID
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Education

The Somali central government fell to opposition clan factions in January 1991. In the wake of that event, and the inability of the various political factions and clan leaders to compromise to set up a new interim administration, the country again fell into anarchy. Everything of any value was looted - right down to the electrical wiring in buildings. In that milieu, all existing government infrastructure was hit very hard - and virtually all education infrastructure was destroyed or looted.

SAACID began its education programming in 1996, when it became obvious that no local political compromise was going to eventuate and that the international community had indeed largely walked away from Somalia.

In the period 1996-2009, SAACID developed a network of 34 primary, secondary and vocational schools in the Benadir (Greater Mogadishu) and Middle Shabelle Regions of Somalia; as well as a women's teacher training institute. SAACID utilised the old Somali government curriculum.

SAACID's network of fee-paying primary and secondary schools were completely physically destroyed over more than 4 years of combat operations by the African Union (AMISOM) and the Somali Federal Government (SFG) against the UN-listed terrorist organisation, Al Shabaab. Some 17 schools were closed after the schools received very significant damage from AMISOM mortar, tank and artillery fire (Al Shabaab had occupied many of the schools as defensive positions). No compensation for the widespread destruction was ever offered by any entity.

What remained was 17 UNICEF-funded free primary schools. UNICEF stopped funding these schools in June 2013, as they transferred all funding to the emerging Somali Federal Government (SFG), with the idea that the SFG would run free schooling. Since that time, SAACID has closed all but 5 schools, and has reopened them as mixed free and fee-paying schools, as the SFG and its UN and Western backers falter with their education blueprint and implementation.

SAACID's free women's teacher's training institute was also closed in June 2011 after long-term funding for the institute was withdrawn (began in 2003) due to funding constraints. The institute reopened again in 2013, but closed again at the end of that year.

The SFG has failed to fill the vacuum for primary,secondary and tertiary education. A plethora of private-for-profit companies have filled the void. The poor in the country (more than 80% of the population) cannot afford education.

SAACID currently operates 5 fee-paying primary and secondary schools.

Overall literacy and numeracy in Somalia remains at around 40%, with boys having significantly higher literacy and numeracy than girls. Obviously, sustained inputs are required to increase literacy and numeracy; and provide children and youth - including girls - with the basis for being able to effectively contribute to the national development of Somalia at a grassroots level.

If you would like to know more about our education programming, or like to contribute to future programming, please feel free to contact us.